detergent making machine how is a diaper vending machine work

detergent making machine how is a diaper vending machine work

Black Mom Invents a Patented Vending Machine For Baby Products

  For Jasmin Smith, it was an intense need that popped up during a trip that transformed into a business—a vending machine business.

  As the mother of twins, Smith realized she no longer had diapers during a trip to her local mall. According to Runway Girl Network, Smith ended up having to buy “blankets and underwear” until she was able to get diapers.

  This incident caused Smith to do research on ways for parents to have access to emergency diapers. She recalls, “I found a woman in Australia who had created a diaper vending machine. But I thought I could do that and add other supplies parents might carry in their diaper bags.”

  When it comes to traveling, parents do their best to be as prepared as possible. But of course, things happen. That’s where Smith’s vending machine comes in. As she states, “I want this machine available to make them feel more at ease. So that’s how Baby Vend was born.”

  Anchorage, Alaska, where the company is located, has the kind of business world in which there’s a small population of people of color networking with each other. During one of those networking conversations, Smith ended up speaking to a friend about Baby Vend who happened to work as a concessions manager at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport.

  “He was excited about it and helped me reach out to the airport. It’s ideal because Stevens is also a very family-friendly airport.” Smith said.

  Once the plan for the vending machine was in motion, Smith decided to stock it with items she carried in her diaper bag including diapers, wipes, pacifiers, thermometers, and teething rings.

  This isn’t Smith’s first business venture. In fact, according to Runway Girl Network, she has her own consulting firm called The Business Boutique. She was also named one of Alaska’s “Top 40 Under 40” in 2017 and had organized a business expo earlier this year for black owners in the area.

  As for the future of this vending machine, Smith is developing a website in which parents can see where the machines are located on a map.

  “We eventually want to be in as many airports as possible so we can be there for parents anywhere,” she said.

   

Diapers in airport vending machines? Baby Vend founder meets a need

  

  For Jasmin Smith, a desperate time that called for a desperate measure has turned into a new business opportunity at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport.

  Smith, the mother of twins, found herself caught without diapers during a trip to her local mall. “I ended up buying blankets and underwear to put on them until I was able to get diapers,” she recalls.

  That incident prompted Smith to search the Internet to see if there were ways for parents to get emergency baby supplies. “I found a woman in Australia who had created a diaper vending machine. But I thought I could do that and add other supplies parents might carry in their diaper bags,” she says.

  Parents try to be prepared for anything when they travel. “I’m an experienced traveler with my kids too, but things happen. I want this machine available to make them feel more at ease. So that’s how Baby Vend was born.”

  The airport is the ideal location for Baby Vend, suggests Smith. “In Alaska, we fly everywhere, because we are not a driving state. And because Anchorage is our largest city, everyone goes through here regularly.”

  Anchorage is also a different business world. “Our population is so small that businesses actually talk and network regularly, especially those of us of color,” she says.

  Smith spoke to a friend who works as a concessions manager at the airport about her idea for Baby Vend. “He was excited about it and helped me reach out to the airport. It’s ideal because Stevens is also a very family friendly airport.”

  In deciding what to stock in Baby Vend, Smith thought about all the things she carried in her diaper bag, including  diapers, wipes, a nose suction device, pacifiers, thermometers and teething rings.

  Smith is waiting to get her final permit from the airport before installing the first Baby Vend machine, but is hopeful it will be in operation by late November “so we can be ready to serve during the huge holiday rush in Anchorage”.

  The airport works with a company that already services and maintains vending machines in the terminal so Smith intends to work with them to keep Baby Vend stocked. “They already have security clearance and they know what they’re doing.”

  Baby Vend also comes with back-office software that tells what is selling well and what isn’t. “As we move forward, we’ll be looking at sales numbers and then determine what to change.”

  Smith, age 32, is no stranger to the business environment. She has her own consulting firm, The Business Boutique. She was named one of Alaska’s “Top 40 Under 40” by the Alaska Journal of Commerce in 2017 and, as an African-American woman, organized a business expo earlier this year for black owners in the city.

  Originally from Georgia, Smith ended up living in Alaska because of her mother, who served in the U.S. Army. “When she decided to get out of the military, she decided to stay in Alaska and raise me here.”

  The Baby Vend founder predicts fast growth for her new venture. “We want to have a website where parents can see a map of where our machines are and what they are stocked with,” she says.

  “We eventually want to be in as many airports as possible so we can be there for parents anywhere.”

  But Smith is also going to pace herself. “I’ll test this for a year and see how it goes. I want to have tangible results before we expand.”

   

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Vending machines expand product offerings, from diapers to charitable contributions

  Vending machine operators have recently been seeking new ways to expand their sales as they face competition from convenience stores that offer an increasing variety of products.

  Japan has a staggeringly high density of vending machines — about 4.9 million units nationwide. About half of these units sell beverages, with annual sales standing at nearly ¥5 trillion at the end of 2016, according to the Japan Vending Machine Manufacturers Association.

  But the spread of convenience stores throughout the country is posing a threat, prompting vending machine operators to find unique or unconventional ways to expand their functions.

  One example is a vending machine installed in a baby changing room at a shopping mall in Yokohama that sells drinks and diapers. Beverage producer Kirin Holdings Co. and household product maker Kao Corp. developed the machine in a tie-up with a nonprofit organization supporting child rearing.

  They put the idea into practice after fathers who are actively involved in raising their children told Comachiplus, a Yokohama-based NPO, that it would be convenient to be able to buy diapers from a vending machine if they forget to bring some along when going out with their babies.

  According to the mall, which is run by Aeon Retail Co., the vending machine has sold about 30 diapers a month since being installed in March.

  The Kirin group has already deployed vending machines that offer opportunities for users to make contributions to charities by buying the items they contain.

  The group, which has long supported activities advocating early detection and treatment of breast cancer, has installed “pink-ribbon” vending machines. Part of the sales proceeds is donated to a fund promoting pink ribbon movements aimed at raising awareness of breast cancer.

  The beverage maker has also set up vending machines linked with support for the development of soccer in Japan, as well as others for local Japanese businesses.

  Another beverage maker, Asahi Soft Drinks Co., has launched vending machines that offer “ice-cold” drinks, whose temperatures are kept at around 1 degree compared with around 5 degrees for conventional machines.

  “As we are expecting a scorching summer this year, I hope more people will buy (from our machines),” said a company official.

  JR East Water Business Co. has installed what it calls an “innovation vending machine.” It is coupled with a smartphone application that allows buyers to pay for items beforehand and even gives a discount. Customers can get the products by holding their smartphones over the machine.

  The machine is also compatible with other electronic payment systems for transportation. An official in charge of the business said the railway company plans to install more such units in its business areas.

detergent making machine how is a diaper vending machine work